Gabriola Vegeteers


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So What Do Vegans Eat?

The third in our series Vegan Question of the Every So Often.
vegan-food
Short Answer

Here’s what the Elated Vegan says:
“A whole new world of food adventures opens up to you when you go vegan. Instead of the boring repetition of meat, veg and potato; you now have 1,000’s of combinations of vegetables, legumes, grains, nuts and fruit to create satisfying meals from. Added to that satiating list, is the vast selection of vegan foods that do a superb job of replacing meat, eggs and dairy with all the taste and none of the cholesterol.

There are so many heavenly flavours, textures and colours to choose from!”

Long Answer
Here is some handy information from PETA on what to eat when starting to go vegan. It includes “What to Buy”, “What to Make”, and “Where to Eat” http://features.peta.org/how-to-go-vegan/.

Vegan Eating Just About Everywhere
Here are some helpful hints from the Mother Nature Network:
http://www.mnn.com/food/healthy-eating/blogs/how-to-be-a-vegan-just-about-anywhere

Vegan Foods From Every Country
Vegan Wanderlust brings us selections of beautiful, delicious food from every country: http://www.veganwanderlust.org/

Humour Answer
avocado

Answer in a Song


Answer in Videos

Vegan Cooking Channels
Here’s One Green Planet’s list of the top 10 YouTube vegan cooking channels: http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/the-10-best-vegan-cooking-channels-on-youtube/

From this list, here’s a preview for Chef Chloe Coscarelli’s channel. By the way, she was the winner of the Food Network’s “Cupcake Wars!”


Chart Answer

A new look at the Food Pyramid!
vegan-food-pyramid

 


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Why Vegan?

The second in our series Vegan Question of the Every So Often.

Why Vegan?

More and more people are choosing a vegan lifestyle – a lifestyle that does not include using animal products. There are so many reasons to be vegan: for yourself, for other people, for other species, for the whole planet. Some of the reasons include: Animal Welfare, Health and Nutrition, Environment, Spiritual, Ethics and Global Food Security. This topic is huge – too much for just one Vegan Question of the Every So Often, so stay tuned.

Picture answer:

why-vegan

Slideshow Answer: Here is a short slideshow from Evolve! that says it so well (approx. 4 minutes),

Debate Answer: Philip Wollen is a former VP of Citibank who left to become a philanthropist to work to help nonhuman animals, the planet and humans in need. Here he is in the very compelling “Animals Should be Off the Menu” debate (approx. 10 minutes).

Long Answer: Here is a very interesting and entertaining, longer video presentation “101 Reasons to Go Vegan” presented by James Wildman, and created by The Animal Rights Foundation of Florida (approx. 1 hour).

Humour Answer:

why-vegan-cartoon

Answer in a Song: Here’s a delightful song by Home and Brook Le’omahala called “Go Vegan!”

Vegan already? How to Keep the Conversation Going:

General advice for talking about “why vegan?” when the question comes up.

1. Find common ground with the person you are talking to. For example, are you both worried about climate change? Do they have high cholesterol like you used to before you became vegan? Do you both love cats? Use the commonality to talk about your food choices.

2. Listen carefully and respectfully to what the other person has to say.

3. Be authentic.

4. Tell your story if you get a chance – whatever your story is. For instance, about looking into the eyes of a pig sitting in a transport truck just before it went into the slaughterhouse, or your realization that the chickens on the farm next door have lives they care about – scratching, forming friendships, communicating, or the fact that you belonged to the 4H club and you were devastated when your bunny was killed for food. Whatever emotional story you have is worth sharing. People who change their eating habits based on their emotions are the ones who stop eating animals for good. Perhaps your story will trigger a similar recollection in the carnist you are talking to.

5. If someone asks you why you are vegan you can say “thanks for asking…are you vegan?” If they say no you can reply, “Oh, why not?” Which immediately changes the emphasis from you justifying your veganism to the other person justifying their carnism. That might start an interesting conversation!


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Where do you get your protein?

The first in our series Vegan Question of the Every So Often.

WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR PROTEIN?

Likely the most asked question that is ever asked a vegan. So popular, in fact, that when asked the question “where do you get your protein vegan”, Google came back with about 7,670,000 results, ranging from videos, fact sheets, charts, interviews, and even a few songs! So, here goes with some answers.

Short Answer: Amino acids, the building blocks of protein, are readily found in legumes (beans), grains, vegetables (especially leafy greens), seeds, nuts, and the many soy products like tofu, tempeh, and soymilk. Eating a variety of whole plant–based foods will easily provide all the protein that we need. It turns out that most North Americans actually eat far more protein than their bodies require to be healthy.

Long Answer: The Vegetarian Resource Group provides a comprehensive article entitled “Protein in the Vegan Diet” by Reed Mangels, PhD, RD from Simply Vegan 5th Edition.

Chart Answer:
protein-chart

Interview Answer: Emily, the “Bite Sized Vegan” interviews well known doctor and nutrition expert, Dr. Michael Greger M.D. Lots of information and humorous, too!

 

Humour Answer:
protein-graphic

Answer in a Song: Vegan Smythe, provider of cruelty free music and comedy, answers the question in this cute song!

 

Questions to Keep the Conversation Going:
1. Have you ever met anyone with a protein deficiency? Do you know the names of any diseases caused by a protein deficiency?
2. Maybe, more importantly, where do you get your fibre? (nutrient which 97% of the population is deficient)?
3. I wonder why some people choose to eat animals for protein, when we can choose to get our protein from plants?